September 2 – To Zubiri

It was still dark as I left the Aubergue at 6:45 am, the sun had yet to show its happy face. It was difficult getting up as during the night the fire alarm went off twice so my sleep was not restful. And, everyone in the Aubergue moves at the same time. Everyone has between 6 and 8 am to get up, dress, and out the door. This Aubergue did not offer any breakfast, instead there were vending machines where various food items could be purchased.

I opted to forego the machines hoping Burguete 3 kms down the road would have coffee and maybe some snacks. I was able to get the coffee but all that was offered were bread products. I decided to press onward. I joined another Canadian lady, named Janet, from Cambridge, Ontario and we trudged together. Another 11 kms at Espinal we stopped for a longer break, more coffee, had a bathroom break and rested our feet and had about 15 minutes without the backpack on.

Also, had to shed my fleece and jacket and put on my silk shirt with another 9 kms to go to reach Zubiri. A total of 25 kms for the day.

We arrived in Zubiri at 14:37. My feet hurt, my knees hurt and my thigh muscles were aching. I was so thankful that the first auberge we stopped at, did have room at the inn. Believe me, a hot shower never felt so good. In my room there are three bunk beds and an additional three single beds – a total of seven women and two brothers in our room.

It was a very, very, long day. Too long. I think I will shorten the next couple of days just to get more conditioning for walking and maybe let the crowds thin out a bit. There are a lot of people walking at this time of the year.

Passing thru the different villages along the way, you noticed when many of the homes were built. Most of the houses have a sign stating when the house was built. I saw many constructed in the 1700s – 1737, 1757, 1787 and others in the 1800s and early 1900s. Along the trail, I was able to enjoy some blackberries. There were elderberries ripe for picking and in one spot there was a clump of autumn crocus blooming. Every so often you would bump into pilgrims you had met before or new ones trudging along. I had a short Spanish lesson from a young civil engineer from Madrid named Roderico. He also passed on a few tips of what to eat for evening meals. We parted ways as he joined a group of Spanish girls resting in a shady spot.

20120902-181453.jpgThe village of Zubiri was a most welcome site today

20120902-202127.jpg

This house dates back to 1738 with the family crest displayed
20120902-181421.jpgLiked the socks hanging under the window

I enjoyed an evening meal with five other women, Eliene from Barcelona, Gabrielle from Germany, Ann from Wales, Pivey from Finland, Janet from Ontario and myself. We discussed the walk, what Aubergue each was staying at and, with help from Eliene, was able to order from a Spanish menu.

Tomorrow, I plan to only walk about 15 kms and then see if I can find an Aubergue for the evening.

My joys for today:

Finding the black berries along the path which were so-so-so good!

The hiker who ran after me to return my walking pole that I dropped because I was focused on getting my picture taken.

Gian for carrying my backpack up to the second floor after arriving aching and tired at the Aubergue.

About journeyingjoyously

Mother, ESL mentor, enjoys the beauty of nature, strives to elicit gratitude, joy and bliss day by day while on the adventure of being human.
This entry was posted in Travel and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to September 2 – To Zubiri

  1. Is there anywhere along the path you have a nice hot bath and a massage? Sounds like you may need it (and really deserve it) after 2 weeks of 15-25km a day!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s